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Our Staff Writers and Editors offer insights on the latest news, events, interviews and other happenings from the development through enterprise and base of the pyramid universes
Thursday, March 31, 2005 — No Region Specified

Partnerships that profit the poor, by Sarah Murray

Source: Financial Times

So far, companies such as Ericsson, Unilever, Total, Tetra Pak, Shell, Thames Water and EDF are participating with pilot schemes in Tanzania, Madagascar, Ethiopia and Bangladesh. Geographically, much of the focus is on projects in Africa. However, the UNDP wants to extend the GSB initiative - which was spearheaded by the UN Global Compact, a voluntary corporate citizenship network - to countries in Asia, Latin America and eastern Europe. While the business activities are commercial, n...
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Thursday, March 31, 2005 — No Region Specified

Interesting India

Source: The Financial Express

Capitalising on our attractiveness for MNCs PepsiCo?s announcement of in-vesting an additional $500 million into its Indian operations should not come as a surprise. PepsiCo, after all, is in the same warp as most other FMCG and durables? majors in the world ? the western markets are saturated and growth is slow to come by. As a result, they are looking at developing nations, such as India, for future growth. In the US, for instance, soft drin...
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

Fabulous fabrications

Source: Economist

A way to help inventors in poor countries realise their ideas The World Bank and the other usual sources of finance for international development say they appreciate fab lab's potential, but consider the project far too speculative. They prefer investing in proven technologies rather than in the process of technology development. Despite this, the labs may be able to spread without support from traditional aid agencies because they may be able to become economically sel...
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

Afghan entrepreneurs find profit in technology, by Michael Coren

Source: CNN

So far, the spread of technology has depended on trade. Commercial routes between cities are feeding the expansion of mobile phone access while whetting the population's appetite for instant communication. It's allowing the very obvious entrepreneurial sprit of Afghans to come out and be expressed, said the State Department official. (Telecommunications) has been a tremendous multiplier for the reconstruction of Afghanistan. Roshan, the largest mobile ph...
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

Help Migrants Wire Home Hope

Source: Business Day (Johannesburg)

African states could work closely with the private sector to modernise their weak financial service infrastructure, especially banking sector technology. This is crucial not only to improving access to formal banking channels in sending and receiving countries, but also to bringing a significant portion of remittance receipts into the financial system. State actions against money laundering and against funds suspected of financing terrorism have had a marked effect on remittances funnelled throu...
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

Bio-fuel to be grown on wasteland

Source: Business Standard

The [Agri-Science Park] is a hub of public-private partnerships to enhance the development and commercialisation of science-generated technologies and knowledge through market mechanisms.? The goal of the ASP is to help achieve ICRISAT?s mandate to develop agriculture in the semi-arid tropics. The ultimate objective is to reduce poverty and hunger, and also to protect environment.? The ASP consists of an Agri-Biotech Park (ABP), an Agri-Business Incubator (ABI), Private Sector Hybrid...
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

Can Tourism Help South Africa's Poor? by Leon Marshall

Source: National Geographic News

Though far outranked by the manufacturing sector as a foreign-currency earner, tourism is a focal point of the country's strategy to reduce its high unemployment rates. Economists estimate that one job is created for every ten foreign tourists who visit South Africa. Experts say tourism can be used as a development tool to bring the country's poor into the economic mainstream. Story found he...
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

CFTRI to promote units in Africa

Source: Business Standard

Export-Import Bank of India (Exim Bank) has signed an MoU with Mysore-based Central Food Technological Research Institute (CFTRI) to promote small-scale food processing projects in African and Latin American countries.? According to T C Venkat Subramanian, CMD of Exim Bank, the technologies developed by CFTRI are most appropriate, adaptable and affordable for developing countries.? For overseas application of food technologies, CFTRI is bringing low cost long shelf life technologies....
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Wednesday, March 30, 2005 — No Region Specified

New Vaccine Said to Offer Hope Against Bacterium, by Donald G. McNeil Jr.

Source: The New York Times

A new vaccine tested in West Africa could save the lives of thousands of poor rural children who die each year from bacterial infections, a team of scientists reported yesterday. The vaccine is a strengthened version of Prevnar, which has been given widely to American infants since 2000 and prevents rare but serious infections with the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacterium. In the third world, the same germ is a major killer, and the new vaccine, tested in Gambia, exceeded our expe...
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Tuesday, March 29, 2005 — No Region Specified

China Flexes Economic Muscle Throughout Burgeoning Africa, by Karby Leggett

Source: The Wall Street Journal

In Africa, as in many other parts of the developing world, China is redrawing geopolitical alliances in ways that help propel China's rise as a global superpower. China is courting other countries to support its plan to reassert political authority over Taiwan and seeking a counterweight against U.S. power in global bodies such as the United Nations. It's also thinking long-term, cultivating desperately poor nations to serve as markets for its products decades down the road. ...
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Wednesday, March 23, 2005 — No Region Specified

On Poor Nations' Most-Wanted List: Sustainable Approaches to Healthcare

Source: Knowledge@Wharton

Governments and nonprofit aid organizations need to create a market for drugs, build better healthcare delivery systems, and keep trained medical personnel from leaving the developing world if they are to improve health in the world's poorest countries, according to panelists who spoke at a Wharton Social Impact Management conference in January. Non-government organizations (NGOs) are considering a new approach to healthcare delivery that is based on human resources rat...
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Wednesday, March 23, 2005 — No Region Specified

Soya beans, the "wonder crop" transforming lives

Source: IRIN

They are calling it the wonder crop. Nutritious, cheap and easy to produce, the soya bean has transformed the lives of poverty-stricken smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe's Mashonaland Central province. At least 16,500 farmers were introduced to soya bean production through a project established by the US-based non-profit organisation, Africare. The project, which began in 2000 in the northern part of the country, has taught production techniques to farmers from the districts o...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Paul Gilding: The profit motive is pure enough

Source: The Australian

People concerned about environmental and social sustainability would be well served by the death of CSR. It needs to be replaced by a far more market-focused approach, a more Darwinian sustainability that sees environmental and social trends as opportunities for growth and competitive advantage. Article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Bringing IT to Rural India One Village at a Time, by Gunjan Bagle

Source: CIO Magazine

Imagine that you live in the village of Siroha, located just 25 miles from Kanpur, the largest city in India's most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. Your son has moved to Delhi for a job with the GE call center serving American customers. If you want to speak to or e-mail him, you must ride your bicycle five miles and lose half a day's wages to find a telephone. Welcome to the digital divide. The digital divide is a fact of life for the 700 million rural peo...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Net Profit, by Jennifer Vilaga

Source: Fast Company (Issue 92)

What does it take to make a better bed net? It's no small matter: Bed nets are a critical defense against malaria, which each year kills 1 million people and makes another 300 million ill in developing regions. The solution, it turns out, is no small matter either. Olyset bed nets, featuring a dramatically better pesticide mechanism and an expected lifetime five times that of existing nets, are now coming off the knitting machines at A to Z, a textile company ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

The U.N. Will not Bridge the Digital Divide, by Arik Hesseldahl

Source: Forbes.com

A new report from the World Bank says half the world's population--that would be about 3.2 billion people if you go by U.S. Census Department world population figures--now has access to a telephone of some kind, either through a fixed line or a wireless network. That's a fair improvement over the 2.5 billion who had access to a phone in 2003, according to the International Telecommunications Union (ITU). Interestingly, more than three-quarters of those people use wireless phones. Private...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Olam and TechnoServe Form Partnership to Develop a Sustainable Cashew Industry in Africa

Source: CSRwire

Olam International Limited and TechnoServe jointly announced today that they have formed a unique partnership to support the development of sustainable and value-added agro-processing initiatives across Africa, starting with cashew processing, which has the potential to create significant economic and social impact in these producing countries. Full press release available here ....
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Why 'Low-Cost' Phones May Not Ring in Africa, by Ken Nwogbo

Source: Daily Champion (Lagos)

GSM Association, the operator-led trade association representing the global mobile industry has launched the Ultra-Low Cost initiative to address high cost of handsets identified as the single biggest barrier to mobile communications affordability in emerging markets. Questions are however being raised about the quality and intentions behind the special phones for Africans. Full article ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

ANZ Bk Cambodia JV Seeks Profits In The Ruins, by Phelim Kyne

Source: Dow Jones Newswire

But Kith said ANZ Royal has targeted a market of around 100,000 urban residents with money 'under the bed (and) under the pillow' to support a banking network that will start with three Phnom Penh branches this year and grow to 30 outlets nationwide by 2010. ANZ Royal will power that expansion by offering Cambodian consumers a previously unavailable array of retail banking services, including the country's first ATMs linked to international networks and consumer mort...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Can Euro Firms Do Well by Doing Good?

Source: Deutsche Welle

Developing African nations are a huge, untapped market. Better supplies of electricity, gas and water, more streets, etc, mean more growth. In many countries, these areas are currently being privatized. And on top of that, there is financing available for companies that want to take part. Full article available here ....
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Mobile companies urged to invest in poor countries

Source: Business Times

If you look at the statistics today, we have 51 million mobile phone users in Africa, but there are a billion people who live there, and at least half of them have disposable income,' he said. 'We're not a basket case, we're not holding out a begging bowl, we're saying there's a commercial opportunity - it's a huge untapped market.' Mr Naidoo was speaking after nine mobile operators announced on Monday that they had commissioned a new range of low...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Farmers, Phones and Markets: Mobile Technology In Rural Development, by Howard Rheingold

Source: TheFeature

Markets aren't only for the rich. Certain kinds of information, however, convey advantages to those have the right data at the right time. Until recently, only the relatively wealthy had swift access to relevant market information. The cost of technologies that connect people with economically useful price data has declined steadily, however, from the tycoons of the early 20th century with their home ticker-tape machines to the day-traders of recent decades with the...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Motorola to sell phones for less than $40 in emerging markets, by Lucas van Grinsven

Source: Reuters

Motorola will enter emerging markets with ultra low-cost mobile phones aimed at 3 billion consumers who cannot yet afford to make wireless calls, the U.S.-based handset maker said on Monday. The phones will be available for less than $40 and the company aims to sell 6 million units in the six months from April to September, said the GSM Association. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

The Next Billion Customers

Source: Red Herring

While Western Europe rapidly approaches saturation, mobile opportunities in markets that were once considered too risky suddenly look quite attractive. But only smaller, lesser-known players with foresight seem to be in a position to profit from opportunities in countries like China, India, Ukraine, Russia, and Nigeria. Established operators like Vodafone find themselves left out. Story available here ....
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Making business for the poor: Innovative approaches can convert poverty into opportunity, says Ferda

Source: Financial Express

The report said that 4 billion bottom of the pyramid (BOP) people with a per capita income of less than $1500 a year provides multinationals and large local companies with an alternative market for their goods and services. A good example of a business ecosystem at work is Hindustan Lever Ltd., a major producer of personal care and food products in India. Its ecosystem includes 80 manufacturing factories, 150 small and medium enterprise suppliers employing up to 40,000 ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

PC builders feel pull of developing world -- For profit or charity, low-cost units target vast untap

Source: Electronic Engineering Times

Under the code name Terra PC, Via plans to use its existing silicon to launch three classes of systems for service providers and systems integrators in China and India. They include full-fledged PCs with gigahertz processors selling for about $250 without a monitor and two versions of thin-client PCs-media stations using flash memory instead of hard drives and comms stations that handle basic browsing, VoIP and e-mail tasks for as little as $100 without a...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Report from Davos: Bridging the Digital Divide, by David Kirkpatrick

Source: Fortune

Corporate leaders, government officials, and researchers at the conference shared ideas on how technology can improve the lives of the world's poor Wiring developing countries-and its poorer citizens-has two virtues. First, since information is power, finding ways to get better information systems-think cellphones, PCs, PDAs, and yet-to-be-invented hybrids-to the world?s disenfranchised will give them greater political clout and financial opportunities. It?s the way to ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

From a handout to a hand up, by Alison Maitland

Source: The Finacial Times

For more than 40 years, Citigroup has supported micro-finance initiatives as a form of philanthropy. Last year, however, it decided to look at them as a business opportunity as well. It appointed a senior banker to develop services and products for micro-lending programmes, initially in Mexico and India. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Microsoft bets on Africa's IT future, by Scarlet Pruitt

Source: IDG News Service

?The company has also invested a hefty amount to establish information and communication technology (ICT) training centers and develop local language versions of its software in Zulu and Swahili, for example. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Gillette India shareholder seeks deal, by Khozem Merchant

Source: The Financial Times

Gillette has signalled its ambitions by selling non-core assets and launching products such as a landmark razor that can be cleaned without running water; millions of Indian consumers lack access to tapped water. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Can tiny science bring big solutions to world's poor?, by Catherine Brahic

Source: SciDev.Net

Nanotechnologies could, for instance, help filter water, provide cheap, clean energy, rapidly diagnose diseases, make information and communication technologies affordable to developing economies, and make food production cheaper and more efficient. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

MIT?s Nicholas Negroponte pushes a cheap PC for the rest of the world

Source: Red Herring

The low-cost computer will have a 14-inch color screen, AMD chips, and will run Linux software, Mr. Negroponte said during an interview Friday with Red Herring at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. AMD is separately working on a cheap desktop computer for emerging markets. It will be sold to governments for wide distribution...Major companies from Hewlett-Packard to Microsoft to Dupont, facing saturated markets in the richest industrial countries, have show...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Tiny Loans Stimulate the Appetite for More, by Betsy Cummings

Source: The New York Times

It used to be that a $50 microloan to start an embroidery kiosk or other modest enterprise was a gateway out of poverty for women in poor countries. Now, some of them are telling aid groups that that is no longer enough. Rather, they want serious money - in some cases, several thousand dollars - to build small businesses, hire employees and establish themselves in a developing marketplace. After almost three decades, the microloan movement has created a global network o...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Poverty tops Davos summit agenda

Source: Aljazeera.Net

Earlier this year I entered for the first time a favela (slum) in Brazil, and I have to say I was really moved,' pharmaceutical chief Daniel Vasella, a co-chairman of the Forum's 2005 annual meeting, said. Vasella - who heads Novartis, the Swiss-based pharmaceutical giant that has enjoyed eight consecutive years of record multi-billion dollar earnings - opted to argue the case for 'the three billion people who still live on less than $2 a day. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Q&A: World poverty:

Source: Times Online

Peter Mandelson, Jeffrey Sachs and Barbara Stocking on whether the world is taking poverty seriously enough Jeffrey Sachs: Business makes trade and I believe the contribution that the private sector and large multi-national companies make to the world are largely positive. But anti-globalisation groups are right to point at shortfalls in the current system. We need to work to shape the rules of the game to provide for a balanced situation where trade ? and the infl...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Putting Global Concerns to a Vote, by John Rossant

Source: BusinessWeek

In the end, the results were surprising for a group whose largest single component is businessmen. The 'winner' was 'poverty' -- 64.4% of the participants in Davos seem to think global poverty is the top issue world leaders must tackle. It was followed closely by 'equitable globalization,' though there were multiple views on what that meant exactly. Full article available ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — Sub-Saharan Africa

Are you ready for Globalisation 2.0?, by Tim Weber

Source: BBC News

In Nigeria, the average mobile phone generates $55 (?29.15) in revenue every month. In Rwanda and Mozambique, two of the world's poorest nations, it is $20 (?10.60). It's not that Africans are mobile phone crazy. Rather, many phone owners make money by reselling airtime to their local communities. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Davos: Stars, Snow, and Seminars

Source: BusinessWeek

Celebs and business luminaries discuss social change at the World Economic Forum, which has a key theme of reaching poor consumers While it's all too easy to poke fun at the 'celeb-ness' of Davos, Gere, Jolie, and Stone will be joining the likes of Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates and C.K. Prahalad, University of Michigan professor of business administration, in serious discussions of how best to promote economic growth and development in Africa, South ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Microcredit a 'Practical' Way to Fight Poverty, by Mar?a Vega

Source: IPS

Of the wide range of strategies identified for combating world poverty, the promotion of microcredits -- and other forms of financing for people with limited resources in developing countries -- has proven to be a highly effective tool, say experts from international agencies. In fact, the success of these initiatives has led the United Nations to designate 2005 as the International Year of Microcredit. Full articl...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

World's Fastest Growing Wireless Market Provides Lessons about ARPU for Developing Countries

Source: PRNewswire

India's wireless market is a test bed for alternative infrastructure, handsets, billing systems, business models and marketing strategies that will likely prove applicable to other developing countries. Full news release available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Micro-Credit: Small can be quite big

Source: The Economist

If there is one common intersection between financial sector reforms, the pro-poor orientation of the Common Minimum Programme, guruspeak on finding gold at the bottom of the pyramid and plain economic sense, it is micro-finance. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Wal-Mart venture to expand in China

Source: CNN

World's No. 1 retailer and Beijing-backed CITIC Pacific to open hundreds of stores over 5 years Foreign retailers looking to expand in China, including France's Carrefour, Germany's Metro AG and Britain's Tesco Plc., have been hampered by restrictions that finally lapsed last month under China's commitments to the World Trade Organization. Now, overseas players can own 100 percent of their stores and set up shop anywhere in the country, although winning ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Three sectors to watch: Technologies that are helping nations jump ahead, by Tyler Hamilton

Source: Toronto Star

Carmanah Technologies of Victoria, B.C., mentioned in a Clean Break column last November, gets around this by combining solar, battery and LED technology. The result is a variety of lighting products that are self-contained, last for five years or more without maintenance, and are continually powered by sunlight, making them energy self-sufficient. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Focus on Technology, by Dorian Bryan

Source: The Barbados Advocate

The mission identified by Ambassador Applewaite include among other proposals, the effort to create a Caribbean Information Society. Others include the adoption of a culture which information and communication technologies (ICTs) as a catalyst for development and the creation of an awareness of the importance of ICTs in our daily lives; in national planning, services, human resource development and poverty alleviation. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Kenya, Uganda Look to Exploit Business Potential, by Kimathi Njoka

Source: The East African (Nairobi)

An export manager of a Kenya based multinational said: 'For an area like Southern Sudan that has been ravaged by war for more than two decades, I am confident that with the newly signed peace pact, there is bound to be a great demand for industrial goods and building materials once people start resettling. I can tell you most manufacturers in the region have eyes set on the Sudanese market.' Full article av...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Suzuki goes off the beaten path to rev up sales, by Tokiko Oba

Source: The Daily Yomiuri Online

Nevertheless, the automaker's willingness to explore new markets in developing countries and in regional areas of Japan--for many years an unconventional policy compared with its domestic rivals--has led to sales rising from 170 billion yen in fiscal 1978 to 2.2 trillion yen last fiscal year. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

GM turns to emerging markets

Source: The Malaysia Star Online

GM is currently focusing on 10 markets, including South Korea, Mexico, India and Poland, a top executive said in a meeting with analysts in Dearborn, Michigan, and in interviews earlier this week at the North American International Auto show in Detroit. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Telecom boom to help reduce poverty

Source: Pakistan Link

According to the PTA Chairman, cellular mobile phone industry has shown spectacular growth and its subscribers have exceeded eight million, registering an increase of over five million connections in 15 months up to December 31, 2004. Full article available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Microsoft turns focus to emerging markets, by Todd Bishop

Source: Seattle Post-Intelligencer

Microsoft Corp.'s research unit is turning to social scientists in a new effort to understand the long-term possibilities for computer technology in developing countries. A Microsoft Research lab, to be inaugurated tomorrow in Bangalore, India, plans to employ anthropologists, ethnographers and others to observe and document the lives of people in India's rural villages. Kentaro Toyama, a 35-year-old Microsoft computer-science researcher who will lead the lab...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Investors Start to Eye Africa, by Ernest Harsch

Source: Africa Renewal

Usually, when investors look around for someplace to put their money, Africa is practically invisible. But at a time of uncertainty in global financial and capital markets -- and with natural resources such as oil in high demand -- a few are starting to give more than a passing glance in Africa's direction. In fact, inflows of foreign direct investment (FDI) to African countries increased in 2003 by 28 per cent from the year before, from $12 bn to $15 bn. This put Africa ...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — No Region Specified

Water Socialists Are All Wet, by Fredrik Segerfeldt

Source: Cato Institute

There may be a solution to what had been an insoluble problem. In recent years, a small number of developing country governments have turned to the private sector for help and have introduced market-oriented reforms in the water sector. Overall, the results have been encouraging. The reforms have had limited scope - 97 percent of all water distribution, after all, is still in government hands - but millions of new households in such diverse locations as Argentina, Cambodia, Guinea, Morocco...
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Tuesday, March 22, 2005 — Sub-Saharan Africa

A model for water provision in urban Africa?

Source: IRIN

The bulk of the US $300 million invested in Senegal's water partnership has come from World Bank loans made to the Senegalese government. And the World Bank seems pleased with its project, noting in an evaluation report in December that the Senegal case is regarded as a model of public-private partnership in sub-Saharan Africa. One of the main criticisms of utility privatisation is that once the water system is being run to make profits, price hikes usually follow which hit...
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Sunday, March 20, 2005 — No Region Specified

GE sees light in the developing world, by Alex Ritson

Source: BBC News

GE is simply seeking opportunities by following new markets, [Ferdinando Beccalli-Falco] says. Growth in the western world is growth that is somewhat limited. Nowadays, the market is in so-called developing countries. The market is in China, the market is in India, the market is in the Middle East. We do go where there is a need for infrastructure creation because GE is an infrastructure company. We supply power generating equipment, we supply locomotives, we supply aircraft engines....
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Saturday, March 19, 2005 — No Region Specified

Sustainable approaches to healthcare

Source: The Financial Express

Governments and non-profit aid organisations need to create a market for drugs, build better healthcare delivery systems, and keep trained medical personnel from leaving the developing world if they are to improve health in the world?s poorest countries, according to panelists who spoke at a Wharton Social Impact Management conference in January. Story available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 15, 2005 — No Region Specified

`The fortune is indeed at the bottom of the pyramid`: Interview with Ratan Tata, by T N Ninan and P

Source: The Business Standard

The fastest growth, Ratan Tata says, does indeed lie at the bottom of the pyramid and discusses his group?s plans to get to it, including a fundamental re-look at how products/services are produced. Interview available here. ...
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Tuesday, March 15, 2005 — No Region Specified

Kraft, Kellogg eye emerging markets

Source: Reuters

International expansion is key for the two of the largest U.S. food companies, company executives said on Monday, but it comes with its share of risks. Speaking at the Reuters Food Summit, Kraft Foods Inc., the largest U.S. food company, said it plans to push deeper into emerging markets this year, but breaking into India has proven to be more of a challenge than anticipated. And Kellogg Co., the world's largest cereal maker, said it was taking a cautious approach on China due to cost consid...
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Sunday, March 13, 2005 — No Region Specified

Nestl? boss starts an African crusade

Source: Times Online

The boss of the world?s largest food company will tell the conference that trade barriers in Europe and America have done more damage to Africa than Third World debt - which has dominated the debate on relieving poverty there. Delegates at the conference - which is being organised by the BBC - include Sir Bob Geldof and Peter Mandelson, the EU commissioner for external trade. ?We are spending in Europe and the US $1 billion dollars every day protecting our agriculture indu...
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Saturday, March 12, 2005 — No Region Specified

Drug giants export trials to China, new markets

Source: Daily Times

Western drugmakers are shifting more clinical trials to emerging markets in a bid to save money, speed research and educate a new generation of local doctors about their products. Just how far the trend has gone was highlighted on Wednesday when researchers announced results from a 46,000-patient trial in China, funded by Sanofi-Aventis SA, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AstraZeneca Plc. The study on blood thinner Plavix and beta blocker Toprol XL, presented at the American College...
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Thursday, March 10, 2005 — No Region Specified

Medical tourism set to take off in a big way, by Shardul Nautiyal and Sapna Dogra

Source: Express Pharma Pulse

With world class healthcare professionals, nursing care and treatment cost almost one-sixth of that in the developed countries, India is witnessing 30 per cent growth in medical tourism per year. According to a CII-McKinsey study, medical tourism can contribute Rs 5,000-10,000 crore additional revenue for up-market tertiary hospitals by 2012. India is the most touted healthcare destination for countries like South-East Asia, Middle East, Africa, Mauritius, Tanzania, Bangla...
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Thursday, March 10, 2005 — No Region Specified

The real digital divide

Source: The Economist

Encouraging the spread of mobile phones is the most sensible and effective response to the digital divide It was an idea born in those far-off days of the internet bubble: the worry that as people in the rich world embraced new computing and communications technologies, people in the poor world would be left stranded on the wrong side of a ?digital divide?. Five years after the technology bubble burst, many ideas from the time?that ?eyeballs? matter more than profits or tha...
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Thursday, March 10, 2005 — No Region Specified

Calling across the divide

Source: The Economist

A necdotal evidence for mobile phones' ability to boost economic activity is abundant: they enable fishermen or farmers to check prices at different markets before selling produce, make it easier for people to look for jobs, and prevent wasted journeys. Mobile phones reduce transaction costs, broaden trade networks and substitute for costly physical transport. They are of particular value when other means of communication (such as roads...
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Wednesday, March 09, 2005 — No Region Specified

Drug trials exported to emerging markets

Source: Reuters

Western drugmakers are shifting more clinical trials to emerging markets in a bid to save money, speed research and educate a new generation of local doctors about their products. Just how far the trend has gone was highlighted on Wednesday when Sanofi-Aventis SA, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AstraZeneca Plc announced results from a 46,000-patient trial of two drugs in China. Story found here. ...
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Wednesday, March 09, 2005 — No Region Specified

Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the World's Poorest Citizens, Makes His Case

Source: Knowledge@Wharton

Last year, a panel of judges from Wharton joined with Nightly Business Report, the most-watched daily business program on U.S. television, to name the 25 most influential business people of the last 25 years. On that list was Muhammad Yunus, managing director of Grameen Bank in Bangladesh and a pioneer in the practice of microcredit lending. Grameen Bank received formal recognition as a private independent bank in 1983 and, as of this month, had dispersed close to $5 billion in ...
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Tuesday, March 08, 2005 — No Region Specified

A charter for Africa's barefoot entrepreneurs, by Rosemary Righter

Source: Business Times

Government-led ?solutions? for Africa, if I may adapt a Blair slogan, look Not Forward, But Back. We should be asking, instead, how best to bring capital and skills together to help these anything but passive ?masses? to do better what millions of them, considering the circumstances, already do surprisingly well. That is why Enterprise Solutions to Poverty , ...
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Tuesday, March 08, 2005 — No Region Specified

Nike Foundation Steps on to New Field

Source: Press Release

The Nike Foundation Refocuses Investments and Advocacy Toward Two of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals - Poverty Alleviation and Gender Equality Celebrating International Women's Day, Nike, Inc. today announced the new focus and direction of the Nike Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. The Nike Foundation will provide grants and leverage Nike?s voice and global reach to help improve the lives and well-being of adolescent girls in the developi...
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Tuesday, March 08, 2005 — No Region Specified

Phones for the poor, by Syed Mohammad Ali

Source: Daily Times

Kenya is estimated to have three million cell phone users among its 30 million people while only 200,000 households have electricity. Indians are buying two million cell phones a month, despite the fact that 300 million of them live in poverty. Phone makers are lobbying for tax breaks arguing that the product is no longer a luxury item. With the increasing saturation of markets in developed countries and the simultaneous expansion of consumerism around the world, many business c...
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Saturday, March 05, 2005 — No Region Specified

Let The Market Find A Cure For AIDS, by Scott Gottlieb

Source: Forbes.com

While most drugmakers have stepped in to make their HIV treatments available to developing countries at no-profit prices, they have not been willing to sign on to schemes that put at risk profits in first-world markets that should have the ability to fund the expensive R&D enterprise that produces these drugs. This has often put drugmakers at odds with international groups, like the WHO, which have been eager to give away today's medicines with scarce regard to what it d...
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Friday, March 04, 2005 — No Region Specified

Eskom proposes hydro-electricity generators on the Congo, by David Hopkins

Source: Edie Newsroom

One of Africa's biggest electricity generating companies is drawing up plans to harness the power of the Congo River to generate electricity. Reuel Khoza, chairman of the South African based power company Eskom Holdings, announced the plans at the Africa Business and Sustainable Development meeting during UNEP's 23rd Governing Council Ministerial Environment Forum. Africa urgently needs energy to lift its people out of poverty and deliver sustainable development. The Co...
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Friday, March 04, 2005 — No Region Specified

Glaxo eyes pacts for developing vaccines, by Vivek Y Kelkar

Source: Business Standard

Glaxo India is planning to enter into an alliance with major government and private research centres in the country for developing its vaccines, especially in areas related to clinical development of its products. Kal Sundaram, the company?s managing director, admitted that the company was open for alliances and was, in fact, actively seeking these, in order to develop and launch vaccines for the Indian and South Asian market. ...
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Wednesday, March 02, 2005 — No Region Specified

Glo Debuts With Mobile Banking Service, by Okechukwu Kanu

Source: This Day (Lagos)

Glo Mobile has begun trials of its mobile banking service, the Glo M-Banking, which allows Glo Mobile customers swift and easy access to their bank accounts from their mobile phones within Glo coverage areas. Glo M-Banking is a collaboration between Glo Mobile and e-payment switch, Interswitch, which, for the first time in Nigeria, provides a uniform interface to a multitude of banks. Story available here. ...
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Wednesday, March 02, 2005 — No Region Specified

Siemens Introduces New Strategy for West And Central Africa, by Martha Eshun & Maame Efua Moses

Source: Accra Mail

Siemens Communication Company, one of the world biggest electronic companies has introduced a new strategy of operating business in West and Central Africa. The strategy include communications, industry, building technologies, energy, transportation, medical solution, and lighting. Story available here. ...
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Wednesday, March 02, 2005 — No Region Specified

GE Pins Hopes on Emerging Markets

Source: The Wall Street Journal

Strategy Is Major Shift From Reliance on the West; Big Rivals Echo Approach, by Kathryn Kranhold General Electric Co. expects to get as much as 60% of its revenue growth from developing countries over the next decade, Chairman and Chief Executive Jeffrey Immelt said in the company's annual report. After nearly four years of reshaping the company through $60 billion in acquisitions of financing, water treatment, security systems, bioscience businesses and a movi...
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Tuesday, March 01, 2005 — No Region Specified

Drought ends for Africa's 'unbankable', by Andrew England

Source: The Financial Times

Juma Tegu Musafiri, managing director, chairman and founder of Buge Fruits 2000, is a man with big dreams. Sitting outside his home in rural Uganda he describes his ambitious plans to expand his company by developing a domestic market for his dried fruit, accessing regional markets and eventually setting up export lines to Europe and beyond. ...
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