Growth and Poverty

Friday, March 1, 2013

The ten years of Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo gave the Philippines a much faster economic growth at around 4.8 percent annually. The only decade-long gross domestic product (GDP) growth higher than this was recorded in the 1950s.

There was a problem, however, with the Arroyo government performance. Poverty incidence did not fall. It was at 33 percent of the population in 2000; it remained at the same level in 2009. Officially though, the country’s 2009 poverty incidence is now placed at 26 percent of the population using a refined method of computing poverty which, according to the government, is now more comparable with other countries.

The Family Income and Expenditures Survey (FIES) conducted every three years by the government is used as basis for computing our poverty data. We still need to wait one year, however, to see the result of the 2012 FIES and one more year before we can see the new 2012 poverty data. What we do see is the result of the self-rated survey on poverty conducted every three months by Social Weather Station. Most of the time, this survey shows a much higher incidence of poverty at more than 50 percent of people surveyed.

– See more at: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/367027/growth-and-poverty#sthash.RS7vSa6I.dpuf

The ten years of Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo gave the Philippines a much faster economic growth at around 4.8 percent annually. The only decade-long gross domestic product (GDP) growth higher than this was recorded in the 1950s.

There was a problem, however, with the Arroyo government performance. Poverty incidence did not fall. It was at 33 percent of the population in 2000; it remained at the same level in 2009. Officially though, the country’s 2009 poverty incidence is now placed at 26 percent of the population using a refined method of computing poverty which, according to the government, is now more comparable with other countries.

The Family Income and Expenditures Survey (FIES) conducted every three years by the government is used as basis for computing our poverty data. We still need to wait one year, however, to see the result of the 2012 FIES and one more year before we can see the new 2012 poverty data. What we do see is the result of the self-rated survey on poverty conducted every three months by Social Weather Station. Most of the time, this survey shows a much higher incidence of poverty at more than 50 percent of people surveyed.

– See more at: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/367027/growth-and-poverty#sthash.RS7vSa6I.dpuf

The ten years of Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo gave the Philippines a much faster economic growth at around 4.8 percent annually. The only decade-long gross domestic product (GDP) growth higher than this was recorded in the 1950s.

There was a problem, however, with the Arroyo government performance. Poverty incidence did not fall. It was at 33 percent of the population in 2000; it remained at the same level in 2009. Officially though, the country’s 2009 poverty incidence is now placed at 26 percent of the population using a refined method of computing poverty which, according to the government, is now more comparable with other countries.

The Familyhttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/icon1.png Income and Expenditures Survey (FIES) conducted every three years by the government is used as basis for computing our poverty data. We still need to wait one year, however, to see the result of the 2012 FIES and one more year before we can see the new 2012 poverty data. What we do see is the result of the self-rated survey on poverty conducted every three months by Social Weather Station. Most of the time, this survey shows a much higher incidence of poverty at more than 50 percent of people surveyed.

Source: Inquirer News (link opens in a new window)

Tags
poverty, poverty alleviation