Thursday
July 26
2018

Viewpoint: Buzzwords and tortuous impact studies won’t fix a broken aid system

Development efforts over the past few decades have not been as effective as promised.

Global poverty remains intractable: more than 4 billion people live on less than the equivalent of $5 (£3.80) a day, and the number of people going hungry has been rising. Important gains have been made in some areas, but many of the objectives set by the millennium development goals – to be reached by 2015 – remain unfulfilled. And this despite hundreds of billions of dollars of aid.

Donors increasingly want to see more impact for their money, practitioners are searching for ways to make their projects more effective, and politicians want more financial accountability behind aid budgets. One popular option has been to audit projects for results. The argument is that assessing “aid effectiveness” – a buzzword now ubiquitous in the UK’s Department for International Development – will help decide what to focus on.

Photo courtesy of Jared Cherup.

Source: The Guardian (link opens in a new window)

Tags
development finance, DfID, economics, foreign aid, global development, Global Goals, Impact Assessment, poverty, poverty alleviation, public policy, SDGs