Contributor.

Manuel Bueno
Grassroots Business Fund

Manuel Bueno is a staff writer for NextBillion.net. He is currently working in the Grassroots Business Fund (GBF) as an Investment Analyst for the Latin American portfolio and as a Knowledge Management Specialist. He earned a B.Sc. in Economics from the London School of Economics and an M.Phil in Organization and Strategy from Tilburg University (Netherlands). As an Analyst, his work includes screening new projects, conducting due diligence, building client relationships and supervising active projects. His Knowledge Management role entails the research and compilation of knowledge generated throughout GBF’s entire portfolio and the dissemination of lessons learned both internally and externally.

Prior to joining GBF, he was employed as a consultant in financial services strategy and transactions at the Deloitte office in Madrid. He has also worked at a microfinance institution in India and at the Opportunities for the Majority in the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington DC. Recently, he co-authored a book with Profs. Juan Luis Martinez and Maria Carbonell (Instituto de Empresa Business School) about the Latin American Base of the Pyramid.

He can be contacted at mbuenovera@gmail.com.

Posts by Manuel Bueno

  • Manuel Bueno

    Grassroots Business Fund Celebrates Its Second Anniversary

    The Grassroots Business Fund (GBF) recently celebrated its second anniversary in a congratulatory mood. It has committed has committed $8M in equity, quasi-equity, debt, grant financing and technical assistance in its 25 investments covering 10 countries in Africa, Latin America, and Asia and reaching almost half a million direct beneficiaries.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    G20 SME Finance Challenge

    The G20 SME Finance Challenge, jointly organized by Ashoka?s Changemakers community, the G-20 and the Rockefeller Foundation, seeks to find the best models worldwide for public-private partnerships that catalyze finance for SMEs and subsequently give creators of those models a chance to solicit funding. Entries will be accepted until August 25.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    Climate Change Opportunities and Threats in Microfinance (Part 2 of 2)

    By 2100, 145 to 220 million people may fall below the $2-a-day poverty line due to climate change. This will have a negative impact on microfinance institutions. In this second part of a two part series I elaborate on how these organizations can modify their products to encourage borrowers to adapt to the negative effects of climate change.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    Pushing Forward Energy Microfinance: Energy in Common

    Energy microfinance only represents 0.5% of the loans issued in microfinance. Energy in Common is a young nonprofit startup that tries to address this gap by focusing exclusively on energy loans. It has partnered with microfinance institutions to support and encourage energy loans while supporting itself from carbon offset donations.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    Climate Change Opportunities and Threats in Microfinance (Part 1 of 2)

    By 2100, 145 to 220 million people may fall below the $2-a-day poverty line due to climate change. This will have a negative impact on microfinance institutions. In this first part of a two part series I explore how microfinance can palliate the impact of global warming and concentrate on carbon offset markets as a source of economic profits.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    Microinsurance: The Ugly Duckling in Financial Services to the Poor

    Being poor means not only surviving with a tight budget, but also managing the unpredictability of an irregular income. Coping with such variability is a fundamental challenge that is often overlooked by financial service providers. This is made worse when poor households suffer external shocks. That’s where microinsurance can play a role.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    Targeting the Ultra Poor: The BRAC Model

    The ultra-poor are the poorest individuals in low income markets and are frequently neglected by private sector initiatives. The BRAC model is a recent attempt to develop an economically sustainable program, specifically targeting this segment to push the poor above the poverty line and teach them how to run their own business.

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  • Manuel Bueno

    Online Microfinance Loan Guarantees: The Model of United Prosperity

    United Prosperity is a young non-profit that turns social investors into social guarantors through an ingenious tweak to the standard P2P microfinance model. This approach increases the capital invested and can build self sufficiency in the local economy by creating formal relationships between MFIs and commercial banks.

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