Development Assistance For Global Health: Is The Funding Revolution Over?

Friday, April 18, 2014

In many ways, the last twenty years have been somewhat of a “revolution” in global health, as marked by rising attention, growing funding, and the creation of new, large scale initiatives to address global health challenges in low and middle income countries. Indeed, the 1990s brought a steady increase in global concern about health, largely centered on the HIV epidemic and due to civil society organizing to draw attention to the growing crisis, leading to the creation of the Millennium Development Goals, and soon thereafter, the GAVI Alliance, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund), and the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, and other efforts.

A key driver of increased funding has been donors – governments and multilateral agencies, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and foundations. And tracking their funding has become one of the critical measures of the global health response.

A new analysis from Dieleman et al., published as a Health Affairs Web First on April 8, provides a needed contribution to the literature on donor funding for health, including an understanding not just of where donor funding is going but of the relationship between aid, burden, and income.

Source: Health Affairs (link opens in a new window)

Categories
Health Care
Tags
global health, governance, health care, HIV/AIDS, philanthropy