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  • Nestl? boss starts an African crusade

    The boss of the world?s largest food company will tell the conference that trade barriers in Europe and America have done more damage to Africa than Third World debt - which has dominated the debate on relieving poverty there. Delegates at the conference - which is being organised by the BBC - include Sir Bob Geldof and Peter Mandelson, the EU commissioner for external trade. ?We are spending in Europe and the US $1 billion dollars every day protecting our agriculture indu...

    Source
    Times Online
  • Drug giants export trials to China, new markets

    Western drugmakers are shifting more clinical trials to emerging markets in a bid to save money, speed research and educate a new generation of local doctors about their products. Just how far the trend has gone was highlighted on Wednesday when researchers announced results from a 46,000-patient trial in China, funded by Sanofi-Aventis SA, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AstraZeneca Plc. The study on blood thinner Plavix and beta blocker Toprol XL, presented at the American College...

    Source
    Daily Times
  • Medical tourism set to take off in a big way, by Shardul Nautiyal and Sapna Dogra

    With world class healthcare professionals, nursing care and treatment cost almost one-sixth of that in the developed countries, India is witnessing 30 per cent growth in medical tourism per year. According to a CII-McKinsey study, medical tourism can contribute Rs 5,000-10,000 crore additional revenue for up-market tertiary hospitals by 2012. India is the most touted healthcare destination for countries like South-East Asia, Middle East, Africa, Mauritius, Tanzania, Bangla...

    Source
    Express Pharma Pulse
  • The real digital divide

    Encouraging the spread of mobile phones is the most sensible and effective response to the digital divide It was an idea born in those far-off days of the internet bubble: the worry that as people in the rich world embraced new computing and communications technologies, people in the poor world would be left stranded on the wrong side of a ?digital divide?. Five years after the technology bubble burst, many ideas from the time?that ?eyeballs? matter more than profits or tha...

    Source
    The Economist
  • Calling across the divide

    A necdotal evidence for mobile phones’ ability to boost economic activity is abundant: they enable fishermen or farmers to check prices at different markets before selling produce, make it easier for people to look for jobs, and prevent wasted journeys. Mobile phones reduce transaction costs, broaden trade networks and substitute for costly physical transport. They are of particular value when other means of communication (such as roads...

    Source
    The Economist
  • Drug trials exported to emerging markets

    Western drugmakers are shifting more clinical trials to emerging markets in a bid to save money, speed research and educate a new generation of local doctors about their products. Just how far the trend has gone was highlighted on Wednesday when Sanofi-Aventis SA, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AstraZeneca Plc announced results from a 46,000-patient trial of two drugs in China. Story found here. ...

    Source
    Reuters
  • Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the World’s Poorest Citizens, Makes His Case

    Last year, a panel of judges from Wharton joined with Nightly Business Report, the most-watched daily business program on U.S. television, to name the 25 most influential business people of the last 25 years. On that list was Muhammad Yunus, managing director of Grameen Bank in Bangladesh and a pioneer in the practice of microcredit lending. Grameen Bank received formal recognition as a private independent bank in 1983 and, as of this month, had dispersed close to $5 billion in ...

    Source
    Knowledge@Wharton
  • A charter for Africa’s barefoot entrepreneurs, by Rosemary Righter

    Government-led ?solutions? for Africa, if I may adapt a Blair slogan, look Not Forward, But Back. We should be asking, instead, how best to bring capital and skills together to help these anything but passive ?masses? to do better what millions of them, considering the circumstances, already do surprisingly well. That is why Enterprise Solutions to Poverty , ...

    Source
    Business Times
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