South Asia.

Share a story idea here (link opens in a new window)
  • Economic Crisis Forces Businesses to Focus on the Poor

    In India, the economic crisis may actually be good news. During the salad days of the past decade, India’s entrepreneurs grew fat selling gas guzzlers and palatial homes to the country’s new rich, while ignoring the needs of the biggest segment of Indian consumers: the poor. It was an expatriate Indian, the University of Michigan’s C.K. Prahalad, who first posited that there were millions to be made selling to the "bottom of the pyramid." Now that’s start...

    Source
    Huffington Post (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
  • Indian Regulations Stifling for Social Investing

    Harold Rosen founded the Grassroots Business Initiative (GBI) of the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation in 2004. In 2008, GBI spun off into the non-profit Grassroots Business Fund, which, among other things, looks at funding socially relevant projects in India. Rosen spoke to Atul Sethi about the potential of social enterprise funding in India: What makes you want to invest in India? India’s world-class, cost-effective skilled labour force canno...

    Source
    Times of India (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
  • Aavishkar Goodwell Invests in Early Stage Microfinance

    SMF will be the first MFI in India to secure equity funding prior to the commencement of its ops. Pune based Suryoday Microfinance (SMF), a micro finance company led by three former bankers, has received an equity investment of Rs 45 million from Aavishkaar Goodwell India Microfinance Development Company. An interesting point to note is that this would be the first MFI in India to secure equity funding from an institutional investor prior to the commencement of its oper...

    Source
    VC Circle (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
  • From Chulhas to Defibrillators: Can Philips India Be All Things to All People?

    Philips India was once unchallenged in India’s lighting and electronics arena. With more than 75 years in the country, the nearly wholly owned subsidiary of the Dutch multinational Royal Philips Electronics boasts impeccable parentage. But competition eroded its vaunted position, and today Philips has redefined itself as a "health and well-being company." "Through consumer insight, we understood that people perceive health and well-being as a combination of superior lifestyle and av...

    Source
    Knowledge @ Wharton (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
  • Low-cost housing in Mumbai: A market at the base of the pyramid?

    Estimates suggest that India has a shortfall of more than 25 million low-cost or affordable houses. The result is sprawling slums that ring some of the country’s largest cities and a bewildering maze of tenement buildings in which three-generations-under-one-roof-families jostle for space and privacy in spaces of 150 square feet and above. As Supriya Menon said recently, they say it is easy to find everything in Mumbai except for a house ( BBC , 15 June). Just lik...

    Source
    CSR Asia (link opens in a new window)
    Categories
    Entrepreneurship
    Region
    South Asia
    Tags
    Acumen Fund
  • Real Economic Development in Afghanistan

    A successful woman-run rug business has been operating for the last five years in Afghanistan. Arzu Rugs currently employs 600 people and provides direct economic support to almost four times that many. Arzu means “hope” in Dari. In addition to the well-paying jobs created by the rug-weaving work, the company funnels its profits back to the community in the form of medical care, education, and social services that touch the lives of an estimated 100,000 Afghans. Arzu was cre...

    Source
    Center for American Progress (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
  • World’s Cheapest Car Hits Indian Streets

    by Phil Hazlewood The world’s cheapest car, the Tata Nano, hit the streets on Friday, as the first customer got the keys to a vehicle that its makers hope will transform travel for millions of Indians. Ashok Raghunath Vichare took delivery of a lunar silver Nano LX model, one of three cars handed over in person by Tata Motors boss Ratan Tata at a city dealership. The 59-year-old customs official from Mumbai said only that he was "very happy" to have got his hands...

    Source
    Yahoo News (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
  • Are Businesses Without Benefactors Better?

    Usually a hot startup bankrolled by eager investors doesn’t care much about its burn rate. In the case of Envirofit, though, that was the obsession from the beginning. The company sells cookstoves to "bottom of the pyramid" customers in India and the Philippines, and thanks to innovative engineering, they use less kerosene, burn hotter, and produce 80% less noxious fumes than the most commonly used models. So impressive is the technology that its inventor, engineer Bryan Willson, was hono...

    Source
    Harvard Business Review (link opens in a new window)
    Region
    South Asia
Subscribe to NextBillion Notes, Our Weekly E-Newsletter
NextBillion's top articles, events and jobs, delivered to your inbox each Wednesday.
No Thanks
Thank you for signing up to receive the NextBillion Notes newsletter.
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
Don't miss out. Subscribe today.
×
×