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  • Virtual - 1 Day
    Tuesday
    June 29
    2021

    Weathering the Storm II: Using Past Crises to Prepare for the Post-COVID Recovery

    Weathering the Storm II synthesizes the experiences and lessons from 16 institutions in 14 countries on four continents that faced a variety of crises over 15-year period. Its aim is to use these lessons to inform those facing future crises, including the impact from the COVID-19 pandemic. One of the key findings from this study is that deep crises have long tails, with most institutions taking at least five years simply to get back to their pre-crisis size.

    The European Microfinance Platform (e-MFP) and the Center for Financial Inclusion (CFI) are pleased to invite you to join for this special seminar featuring the leaders of two of these institutions – Kashf Foundation, Pakistan, and Viator Microcredit Azerbaijan. They will be joined by the lead author of the Weathering the Storm project, as well as the author of the case study of Spandana, India, and expert on the 2010 Andhra Pradesh crisis. Together, they will discuss how past crisis experience has helped them face the COVID-19 crisis and prepare for the coming recovery. They will also happily answer your questions.

    • Aynur Alieva, Executive Director and Chair of the Management Board, Viator Microcredit Azerbaijan
    • Roshaneh Zafar, Founder and Managing Director of Kashf Foundation
    • Narasimhan Srinivasan, Freelance consultant and author of WTS II case study on Spandana
    • Daniel Rozas, author of Weathering the Storm I and II and Sr. Microfinance Expert at e-MFP
    • Deborah Drake (moderator), Vice President, Investor Engagement and Research, CFI

    Time: 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM CEST

    Tags
    Coronavirus, Webinar
  • Virtual - 1 Day
    Tuesday
    June 29
    2021

    Climate Risk Insight Hour

    Working in partnership to achieve a climate neutral economy

    Globally, 2020 was one of the warmest years on record. Global concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) also continued to increase. The data also show that atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases for 2020 were at their highest global annual average in the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) satellite record since 2003.

    Analysing the interplay of variables like temperature, sea ice, precipitation, river discharge or soil moisture underlines the importance of monitoring all parts of our climate system. This helps us understand changing climate trends, with traceability back to the original data.

    Now, it is more important than ever that we use the available information to act, mitigate and adapt to climate change. The Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) provides key information that can help accelerate our efforts to reduce future risks. Collecting and processing the right data can help create high quality information that can lead to informed decision-making.

    However, a joint effort is needed that requires the full mobilization of society, governments and industries. These sectors need the best available information on the forthcoming impacts of climate change.

    Some of the key questions addressed will include: 

    • What tools and data do you need to analyse and quantify climate risk?
    • Where can firms access quality “decision-relevant” climate data and where are the data gaps?
    • What data sources should you consider and how can these be built into an organisation’s decision architecture?
    • With the Green Deal aiming at embedding climate neutrality in government policies – how can you turn climate change into an economic opportunity? And what can institutions expect from the shift from voluntary to mandatory climate reporting?
    • How can insurance companies understand long-term climate severity trends to make better informed underwriting, pricing, and investment decisions?

    Time: 2:30 PM BST 

    Tags
    Speaker, Webinar
  • Virtual - 1 Day
    Tuesday
    June 29
    2021

    Phone Surveys Using Random Digit Dialing: Lessons Learned from IPA’s Multi-Country RECOVR Surveys

    Random Digit Dialing (RDD) has become one of the most commonly used methods for selecting phone survey participants, especially after in-person restrictions were imposed due to COVID-19. Until now, there has been little available evidence on the effectiveness of different RDD strategies for ensuring high data quality and representativeness in low- and middle-income countries. In this webinar, researchers and experts from IPA will share strategies that allowed IPA to implement RDD surveys in nine countries in Asia, Africa, and Latin America as part of the Research for Effective COVID-19 Responses (RECOVR) rapid phone surveys (poverty-action.org/recovr/recovr-survey). These surveys documented real-time trends of policy concern and informed decision-makers about the economic toll of the pandemic. Researchers and experts will also share lessons learned on phone survey methods and recommendations to improve these methods based on two motivating examples in Mexico City and Colombia. We encourage audience participation with questions or suggestions.

    These findings come from a collaboration between IPA and the Northwestern University Global Poverty Research Lab (GPRL) on research methods. More on the Research Methods Initiative can be found on the GPRL website ((kellogg.northwestern.edu/research/global-poverty-research-lab/research/clusters/research-methods.aspx) and IPA website (poverty-action.org/researchers/working-with-ipa/research-methods-initiative).

    Time: 9:00 AM EST

    Tags
    Coronavirus, Webinar
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